Skip to content

Category: Articles

Proposal outline for first projects backed by Clean Research at the University of Washington (UW)

Our team is committed to solving the current research gaps associated with the production of “cell-based” meat. Furthermore, we believe that a single species focus will enable greater advancement of the science and move us closer to solving the problems associated with commercial-scale meat production.

Leading Interdisciplinary Science Team Publishes Groundbreaking Peer-Reviewed Manuscript on the Future of Cell-Based Meat

Clean Research, a 501(c)(3) science and technology initiative, announced the publication of its groundbreaking research paper, “A More Open Approach Is Needed to Develop Cell-Based Fish Technology: It Starts with Zebrafish,” demonstrating that lean fish meat is likely a more straightforward first cell-based meat to produce as a one-for-one replacement equivalent for real meat.

Re: “The End of Meat Is Here”

The opinion article in the New York Times, “The End of Meat Is Here,” gets some things right but misses the boat in two crucial ways. It’s the end of animal agriculture, not meat. And it’s not here, but near, if you consider 20 years or so “near.”

The Best Sources for Updates and News on the Coronavirus

For the most reliable information on the pandemic, RealClearScience has you covered. RCS compiles and shares clear, relevant, and evidence-based science news and opinion.

Lean fish have advantages over meat and poultry for cell-cultured protein production, claims nonprofit

Lean fish could have significant advantages over other aquatic or terrestrial species for cell-cultured protein production, according to the founders of Clean Research, a new open science initiative created to accelerate the research and development of cell-cultured fish.

Sizzling interest in lab-grown meat belies lack of basic research

As published on nature.com, this article outlines how ‘Clean meat’ firms have drawn tens of millions of dollars in investment in recent years, but technical hurdles remain.